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Dating During College Football Season

 

Couple watching tvLast night marked the beginning of the college football season at the sport’s highest level. No doubt, there are fans across the nation already stocking up on charcoal and face paint.

If you found you were fighting over the remote last night, it's going to be a long weekend - and I don't mean Labor Day. College football games continue tonight . . . and all day tomorrow . . . and there are more Sunday and Monday.

And if you’re not a college football fan, you might be wishing you weren't dating one by the time Tuesday rolls around.

It’s Just Lunch, a matchmaking service for busy professionals, conducted a survey of over 1,400 people to determine the role sports play in relationships. According to the results, the role can be pretty important – especially if you’re younger.

Glued to the tube

The younger someone is, the more likely they are to spend all day Saturday or Sunday in front of the television watching college football or the NFL. Forty-one percent of 25- to 34-year-olds said they’d be excited to learn that’s how their partner wanted to spend the day. Unfortunately for the sports fans, that number was just 16 percent when 45- to 54-year-olds were asked the same question.

We asked college football fans on Twitter what their significant other does on Saturdays while they’re busy watching college football. From the responses, it sounds like it’s a great day for a little “me” time.

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Is it important you both like sports?

Some in our survey might not be happy simply chalking up college football Saturdays as “me” time. Fifty-nine percent of men and 43 percent of women said they wanted a partner who would watch a game or go to a game every once in a while. Twenty-five percent of the 25- to 34-year-olds said their partner must like sports and be willing to go to and watch games. That insistence seems to fade with age. Just 10 percent of 55- to 64-year-olds felt so strongly about sharing their sports habit with their significant other.

Do sports ruin relationships?

It seems those disagreements over how many games you’re going to watch, or attend, might not be so great for your relationship. Nearly one in every five people who took the survey indicated sports have negatively impacted a relationship in the past. For 18- to 24-year-olds, that number rose to one-in-three. However, it dropped to one-in-ten for 55- to 64-year-olds.

Women identified the primary issue as the amount of time and money spent on sports, while men admitted a bad mood after a “crappy game” caused a fight.

Want to make it through college football season with your relationship intact? Check out our tips for surviving football season together. 

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Is it important to you that your potential partner like sports or be open to learning more? Let the matchmakers at It's Just Lunch help you find your match! Get started today by calling us at 1-800-489-7897 or click here to tell us a little about yourself.