Sports

11 Ways Dating is Like Football

IJL - 10 Ways Dating is Like FootballAs we gear up for the Super Bowl this weekend, we've been thinking about all the ways in which dating is like football. When we put pen to paper, we realized they're even more similar than we initially thought . . .

Remember your uniform

When an NFL team takes the field, their uniforms are clean and pressed and tucked in. When you go out on a date, you want to look your best. Give some thought to what you’re wearing, and dress appropriately for the venue. 

Everyone can’t be the quarterback 

In high school it was the quarterback and the head cheerleader who ruled the universe. There will always be people around you who are clearly the quarterback, and sometimes you’ll find yourself wishing you had that person’s life. Don’t try to be something you’re not. Avoid exaggerating about your role at work or your financial situation. It will come back to bite you down the road.  

Unsportsmanlike conduct

Just like certain behaviors aren’t tolerated in football, there are some slip-ups that will get you in trouble on a date. Maybe you’re rude to the server or have road rage. If your date catches you at your worst, they could see it as a red flag. No one wants you to turn on them like that in the future.

Excessive celebration 

Act obnoxious, and you will draw a penalty. Maybe  you’re a super fan that draws comparisons to Jimmy Fallon’s character in Fever Pitch. Or perhaps you’re  someone who tends to imbibe a little too much and annoy everyone around you. Whatever the case may be, showing too much of your personality too early can turn some people off. But maybe that’s for the best anyway – you want someone who likes you for you, right?

Don’t get called for holding

Try to get a little too handsy on the first date, and you may find yourself in trouble fast. Pay attention to the clues your date is giving you. Are they touching you on the arm while you’re talking? Small gestures like that mean they may be ready for more contact, but if it’s a first date and you’re not getting those signals, it may be too early for a first kiss or other physical contact.

Embrace the pregame meal 

You don’t want to order the biggest, most expensive thing on the menu or eat so much your date wonders if you have a hollow leg. Have a little snack before you go out to dinner on those early dates. It’ll keep you from getting crabby when the food doesn’t arrive for an hour, and you won’t embarrass yourself by overeating.

Stay focused 

Neither Peyton Manning nor Cam Newton will be on their phones texting and checking their email during the big game. You shouldn’t be either. Leave your phone in your pocket, purse or car.

You won’t go undefeated 

Few teams make it through the season undefeated. In fact, both teams in this year’s Super Bowl have a loss. You probably won’t go undefeated either – there will be dates and significant others who don’t work out along the way. You have to just suit up and get back in the game.

Enjoy the game 

The best players do enjoy playing. Dating shouldn’t feel like an obligation or a chore. Go out there and have some fun.

Always wear a helmet 

If you find yourself heading for the goal line in a physical sense, you should always wear protection. Enough said.

Put a ring on

Last, but not least, the ultimate achievement in both dating and football is celebrated with some similar hardware: a ring!  

 

Ready to get in the game? Let the matchmakers at It's Just Lunch help you find your match! Get started today by calling us at 1-800-489-7897 or click here to tell us a little about yourself.


Dating During College Football Season

 

Couple watching tvLast night marked the beginning of the college football season at the sport’s highest level. No doubt, there are fans across the nation already stocking up on charcoal and face paint.

If you found you were fighting over the remote last night, it's going to be a long weekend - and I don't mean Labor Day. College football games continue tonight . . . and all day tomorrow . . . and there are more Sunday and Monday.

And if you’re not a college football fan, you might be wishing you weren't dating one by the time Tuesday rolls around.

It’s Just Lunch, a matchmaking service for busy professionals, conducted a survey of over 1,400 people to determine the role sports play in relationships. According to the results, the role can be pretty important – especially if you’re younger.

Glued to the tube

The younger someone is, the more likely they are to spend all day Saturday or Sunday in front of the television watching college football or the NFL. Forty-one percent of 25- to 34-year-olds said they’d be excited to learn that’s how their partner wanted to spend the day. Unfortunately for the sports fans, that number was just 16 percent when 45- to 54-year-olds were asked the same question.

We asked college football fans on Twitter what their significant other does on Saturdays while they’re busy watching college football. From the responses, it sounds like it’s a great day for a little “me” time.

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Is it important you both like sports?

Some in our survey might not be happy simply chalking up college football Saturdays as “me” time. Fifty-nine percent of men and 43 percent of women said they wanted a partner who would watch a game or go to a game every once in a while. Twenty-five percent of the 25- to 34-year-olds said their partner must like sports and be willing to go to and watch games. That insistence seems to fade with age. Just 10 percent of 55- to 64-year-olds felt so strongly about sharing their sports habit with their significant other.

Do sports ruin relationships?

It seems those disagreements over how many games you’re going to watch, or attend, might not be so great for your relationship. Nearly one in every five people who took the survey indicated sports have negatively impacted a relationship in the past. For 18- to 24-year-olds, that number rose to one-in-three. However, it dropped to one-in-ten for 55- to 64-year-olds.

Women identified the primary issue as the amount of time and money spent on sports, while men admitted a bad mood after a “crappy game” caused a fight.

Want to make it through college football season with your relationship intact? Check out our tips for surviving football season together. 

  IJL_Eblast_SportsSurvey

Is it important to you that your potential partner like sports or be open to learning more? Let the matchmakers at It's Just Lunch help you find your match! Get started today by calling us at 1-800-489-7897 or click here to tell us a little about yourself.


Should You Reveal You’re a Sports Fan to Your Date?

ThinkstockPhotos-147067540In the midst of March Madness, it appears everyone is a sports fan . . . at least for the month. An estimated 40 million Americans fill out brackets for March Madness – otherwise known as the NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament – with the average person filling out nearly two brackets, for a grand total of 70 million brackets. That’s more than the number of ballots cast for either candidate in the 2012 presidential election. Sad, but true. 

And while you might know to steer clear of controversial topics like politics on your first few dates, you might not think to tone down your interest in sports. A recent survey conducted by It’s Just Lunch suggests perhaps you should. 

Sports can ruin relationships 

We’re being serious. Nearly 20 percent of respondents in the survey revealed they’ve had a previous relationship ruined by sports. The younger the respondent, the more likely they were to say sports had sabotaged a relationship, with a staggering one-in-three 18- to 24-year-olds saying sports had gotten in the way. 

Women were more likely to say the source of the angst was the amount of time and money spent on sports, while men were more likely to admit that a bad mood after a “crappy game” caused the fight. 

 

Stay away from stadiums and arenas 

There’s a reason It’s Just Lunch sends couples to lunch for their first date instead of say a baseball game. It’s a low-pressure atmosphere where you aren’t stuck trying to talk between pitches for three hours. 

Not sold yet? Check out the results of our survey: over 30 percent of men in the survey said they’d rather not go to a sporting event on a first date, along with 23 percent of the women. Those who thought it was a bad idea thought it was a really bad idea: 

Gamble on love, not sports 

Two billion dollars is expected to be wagered on March Madness this year, with the average person spending $29 per bracket. Whether you’re doing some serious damage in Vegas or throwing money in a jar for the office pool, you might be exhibiting qualities potential mates don’t find attractive. 

Nearly one-third of men and women who participated in our survey indicated they weren’t interested in dating someone who bets on sports. Another fifty percent said it depended on the amount of money being wagered. 

Our advice? Gamble on love, not sports. 

How important are sports? 

Despite the somewhat tumultuous relationship between sports and dating, don’t be surprised if sports comes up on the first date, however. Especially if you’re under 35-years-old. Twenty-five percent of 25- to 34-year olds in the survey said their partner must like sports and be willing to go to and watch games. That percentage dropped to 16 percent among 35- to 44-year olds and 13 percent among 45- to 54-year olds. 

If you find your conversation turning to sports, remember that most things are fine in moderation. And if you think you might be tempted to watch the game on a television over your date’s shoulder in the restaurant (and scream about how much you hate Kentucky), maybe wait until after the tournament is over to head out on that first date.  

Are you still looking for your match? Let the matchmakers at It's Just Lunch help you. Get started today by calling us at 1-800-489-7897 or click here to tell us a little about yourself. 


Do Sports and Dating Mix?

186918094No doubt, men and women across the country will sit down next weekend to watch the Super Bowl together. For many, it might be the only time of year they enjoy a sporting event together. For others, however, sports are an important part of their life, and they want a partner who can enjoy sporting events with them.

It’s Just Lunch, a matchmaking service for busy professionals, conducted a survey of over 1,400 people to determine the role sports plays in relationships. The results of the survey suggest that the younger you are, the more important it is that you have sports in common. Here are some of the most interesting results from the survey:

Nearly one in every five people in the survey said sports have negatively impacted a relationship in the past. That number rose to one in every three people when looking at the 18-24 age group and dropped down to one in ten with those aged 55-64. Women were more likely to say the issue was the amount of time and money spent on sports, while men were more likely to admit that a bad mood after a “crappy game” caused the fight.

Good news for sports teams: 45 percent of both men and women say they’d like to go to a sporting event for their first date. Somewhat surprisingly, women were more enthusiastic about it than men. Only 23 percent of women said they’d rather not go to a sporting event on a first date, compared to over 30 percent of men.

The younger someone is, the more likely they found it important their partner be interested in sports. Twenty-five percent of 25- to 34-year olds indicated their partner must like sports and be willing to go to and watch games, whereas only 10 percent of 55- to 64-year olds felt the same way. Overall, 59 percent of men and 43 percent of women wanted a partner who would watch a game or go to a game every once in awhile.

Younger people are also more likely to spend an entire Saturday or Sunday in front of the television watching college or NFL football five months out of the year. Forty-one percent of 25- to 34-year olds said they’d rejoice if they learned their partner spent their weekends this way, because that’s how they like to spend their weekends. That number plummeted to 16 percent in the 45-54 age group.

More good news for sports teams: 84 percent of people said they’d be willing to use vacation time to travel to a sporting event with their significant other. Fifty-three percent of both men and women said they’d be ok if it was just once for a big event, and 31 percent responded with the more enthusiastic: “When do we leave? I’ll pack my bags!”

Super Bowl parties could be a good place to meet a date. Forty-five percent of both men and women said a Super Bowl party would be a good place to meet a date. Only 21 percent of men and 14 percent of women responded that Super Bowl parties were a bad place to meet a date, the rest said it depended on who was throwing the party.

Have sports ever been an issue in your relationship? Check out our tips for making it through football season together, which can easily be applied to any sport!

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Source:   It’s Just Lunch 2015 survey of 1400+ singles

Is it important to you that your potential partner like sports or be open to learning more? Let the matchmakers at It's Just Lunch help you find your match! Get started today by calling us at 1-800-489-7897 or click here to tell us a little about yourself.


Dating, Relationships and Football Season

186918094The college football season kicked off last week, and the NFL regular season is upon us this week. It can be a pivotal point in a young relationship. Does she have any idea just how many hours you spend in front of the television on Sundays? Does he know you spend Saturdays at a bar with your local alumni club cheering on your alma mater? Are you – gasp – fans of rival teams?

As with most aspects of a relationship, communication and compromise are the keys to surviving football season with your relationship still intact. Below are some of the most common problems you might encounter during football season and ways to resolve your differences.

One of you doesn’t understand the game

We all enjoy watching sports more when we understand what’s happening. However, it’s unlikely to be a positive experience if you’re having to explain the difference between a quarterback and a tight end during a game you really want to watch. Instead, sit your partner down during a game whose outcome doesn’t concern you and use that as your teaching moment. Don’t buy a copy of Football for Dummies (although it’s a great resource and you can use the book’s online material to help you with your instruction) and expect them to read it in their spare time and pick the game up. If you want them to learn the game, invest time in teaching it. You could even head out to a local high school game and make it into a fun date night activity.

You don’t have the same watching habits

The good news is you both enjoy watching football, but the bad news is you don’t enjoy watching it the same way. You want to watch the game with 20 of your closest friends but your significant other finds it too distracting to watch the game around so many people. There are a couple of ways to compromise here. If you’re fans of different teams, you could always split up and watch games separately. However, if you’re fans of the same team, or you simply want to include one another in your game day plans, switch off throughout the season. Communication is key. If it’s really important to you to watch a specific game in a certain atmosphere, explain that ahead of time.

You’re fans of rival teams

You have no problem all season long until your teams face one another. Do you watch together? Do you split up and watch with other fans of your team? There’s nothing wrong with splitting up for a game and watching it with friends who’ll do the Gator chomp right alongside you in the name of keeping the peace. If you do watch together, however, keep the heckling to a minimum until you have a solid gauge on how the other person will react. Maybe they can take it as good as they can give, but maybe they can’t. Are you willing to create animosity in your relationship because you can’t control your need trash talk during the game? That probably says a lot about the viability of a house-divided relationship for you.

You don’t want him/her in your fantasy football league

Your partner is interested in football, but the problem is they want to be in your fantasy football league. Whether you don’t have room in your current league or simply don’t think trying to convince eight of your best friends from college that your new boyfriend/girlfriend should take the open spot in your league this year, there’s a simple solution: embrace fantasy football as something you can enjoy together and suggest a league you can join together, even if it means you now have to maintain teams in two leagues. If you really enjoy fantasy football, it’s probably not much of a sacrifice. It’s also a great way to enjoy watching games together as you root for your respective fantasy players. 

You have season tickets with your best buddy

You’ve had Eagles season tickets with your best friend since the eighth grade for the last decade, and you go to every home game together. Now you’re dating someone showing a genuine interest in going to a game, but you only have the one ticket and your buddy isn’t giving theirs up even for one game. If you want your partner to continue to show an interest in football, you’re going to need to nurture it. Pony up for another set of tickets for at least one game and sell your season ticket to a friend. If you’re not willing to give up your tradition with your friend for even one game, then you’re probably not dating the right person. Embrace making new traditions with your partner.

Your partner’s life revolves around the football schedule

Some diehard football fans can’t imagine not sitting in front of the television from Thursday night all the way through Monday night to catch as many games as possible. However, it’s unlikely you’ll find a partner equally dedicated to that pursuit. If you’re a big college football fan, maybe you set aside Saturdays and make it known that is not a good date night. If you’re a bigger NFL fan, maybe it’s Sundays. Sure, there will be a Thursday, Friday or Monday night game you don’t want to miss at some point, but you can’t expect to build a relationship with someone early on if you’re blocking off every Thursday through Monday for football (unless, of course, you’re lucky enough to find someone who feels the same way).

Is it important to you that your potential partner like football or be open to learning more about football? Let the matchmakers at It's Just Lunch help you find your match! Get started today by calling us at 1-800-489-7897 or click here to tell us a little about yourself.